The Chilean Night Sky in Ultra High Definition

astronomy, communication, ESO, science communication

I am pleased to announce here “Phase 2” of our ESO Ultra HD Expedition releases. In ESO’s Education and Public Outreach Department (ePOD) we have been busy working through the 10TB of UHD footage our ESO Photo Ambassadors captured while visiting each of ESO’s sites in Chile in April/May.

Each of the huge number images and videos have to be carefully processed by our graphics team as they help bring out the very best of this stunning footage. Once these are uploaded by our web team, it is the responsibility of the science communication interns (that includes me!) to give some description to each of the images and videos to try to put them into some context for our archive. This also requires a careful consideration of certain keywords, which can help with a search of the vast amount of content ESO makes available to the public.

Our video coordinator, Herbert Zodet (also a team member on the expedition) carefully brought together some of the most spectacular timelapses and other footage taken during the expedition for inclusion in the ESOcast. It was my responsibility to co-write the script, working within a basic skeleton of the ideas we put together from this material.

Here’s the announcement of the ESOcast, which was released along with a blog post from Herbert about capturing the Chilean night sky in ultra HD. The ESOcast can be viewed on YouTube, as seen below:

As another month passes by, it is now my final month here at ESO. It’s a pity it will soon come to an end, but I’m looking forward to making the most of my time left both at ESO and in/around Munich. It’s been a lot of fun, as much as it has also been a lot of work. All in all it has been a fantastic experience.

The ESOcast is a video podcast series dedicated to bringing you the latest news and research from ESO — the European Southern Observatory. Subscribe to the video podcast now to keep up with the latest news from ESO: the ESOcast is available via iTunes in HD and SD. It’s also available on YouTubeVimeo and dotSUB and is offered for download in several formats.

Featured image: Screenshot of ESOcast 65. Credit: ESO

First Results from ESO Ultra HD Expedition

astronomy, science communication

As a science communication intern in ESO’s  Education and Public Outreach Department (ePOD), I am involved at the heart of the outreach activities for this revolutionary ESO Ultra HD Expedition into the “Ultra High Definition Universe”. It has been great to be a small part of the expedition from the very start, throughout the expedition itself and now, the huge amount of UHD content being worked on currently. The first results from the expedition have now been released (see announcement for further details). 

A huge amount of content (over 120GB!) has been released freely to the public for usage under a very liberal licensing model.  ESO is perhaps the first scientific organisation to deliver free Ultra HD content which it aims to now do on a regular basis. This includes UHD footage suitable for planetarium shows  footage which will be used in thESO Supernova facility from 2017.

You can follow the ESO Ultra HD expedition on the ESOultraHD blog and on Twitter at #ESOultraHD.

Featured image credit: ESO/B. Tafreshi

ESO Ultra HD Expedition Well Under Way

astronomy, communication, science, science communication

The ESO Ultra HD Expedition is well underway. I feel in a unique and privileged position as a science communication intern in ESO’s  Education and Public Outreach Department (ePOD) to be involved at the heart of the outreach activities for this revolutionary expedition into the Ultra High Definition Universe. The European Southern Observatory (ESO) — the world’s most productive astronomical observatory — aims deliver free Ultra HD content to all, from consumer to broadcaster for the first time.

After arriving in Chile last Monday, the team first set out to Paranal, home of the Very Large Telescope array (VLT) — ESO’s flagship facility for European ground-based astronomy. From here they have already taken a vast array of truly stunning images which can be seen on the ESO Ultra HD Expedition blog. I preview some below.

One of the Unit Telescopes with the Milky Way illuminating the VLT platform. One of the Auxiliary Telescopes can be seen to its right. Taken during the ESO Ultra HD Expedition. Credit: ESO/Y. Beletsky

Babak at work on the VLT platform alongside Auxiliary Telescope 3 (AT3) during the ESO Ultra HD Expedition. Credit: ESO/C. Malin (christophmalin.com)

Today they will arrive at ALMA, the Atacama Large Millimeter/sub-millimeter Array.  Located on the Chajnantor Plateau, 5000 metres above sea level, the individual antennas can combine to act together as a giant single telescope.

On the final leg of the expedition, the team will head to La Silla, ESO’s first observatory. Located on the edge of the Atacama Desert, it is 600 kilometres north of Santiago, and 2400 metres above sea level. La Silla is home to the ESO 3.6-metre telescope and the 3.58-metre New Technology Telescope (NTT).

You can follow the ESO Ultra HD expedition on the ESOultraHD blog and on Twitter at #ESOultraHD.

Featured image above: A panoramic shot of the VLT platform with the red shades of airglow visible overhead. Credit: ESO/Y. Beletsky. For the full image visit the ESO website here.