Visit to Neuschwanstein

travel

A few weeks ago, on my birthday, I ventured off with a visiting friend on a tour of Neuschwanstein castle (“New Swanstone castle”).

With an early start, we needed to be at Munich’s central station (Hauptbahnhof) before 09:30 am for a guided tour. Packed with several snacks and drinks for the journey, we took the train to the village of Füssen in southwest Bavaria, about a 2-hour trip from Munich. At Füssen, a coach then met us for the short ride to the village of Hohenschwangau.

We began the tour in sight of Schloss Hohenschwangau, the childhood residence of King Ludwig II of Bavaria and was built by his father, King Maximilian II of Bavaria. From here, we made our gradual ascent towards Neuschwanstein.

Hohenschwangau Castle (High Swan County Palace),  the childhood residence of King Ludwig II of Bavaria. Credit: Ryan J. M. Laird

Hohenschwangau Castle (High Swan County Palace), the childhood residence of King Ludwig II of Bavaria. Credit: Ryan J. M. Laird

The weather treated us very well indeed, offering us some of the best views of each of the castles. The weather that week had been rather wet, so this came as a complete surprise. Only the day before was it almost completely overcast. Braced for inclement weather, I wore my coat and jumper which soon turned out to be a mistake in the heat.

A close-up view of Neuschwanstein among the bright sunshine during the tour. Credit: Ryan J. M. Laird

A close-up view of Neuschwanstein among the bright sunshine during the tour. Credit: Ryan J. M. Laird

View of the Alps from Neuschwanstein castle. Credit: Ryan J. M. Laird

View of the Alps from Neuschwanstein castle. Credit: Ryan J. M. Laird

Overall, we were treated to some stunning views. A truly brilliant birthday.

Featured image – Magnificent view of Neuschwanstein castle. Credit: Ryan J. M. Laird

Bitte Zurückbleiben!

science, travel

Each morning I take the U-bahn (underground) from my current home in Garching to Garching Forschungszentrum (research centre) as I head to work at the European Southern Observatory (ESO). I’ve become familiar with the sound of the U-bahn: “Bitte Zurückbleiben!” (Please stand back!) as the doors of the train close.

The centre is also home to many other top scientific organisations. With more than 6,000 employees and more than 13,000 students, the Garching Forschungszentrum is one of the largest centres for science, research and teaching in Germany. I feel very privileged to be here.

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Garching Forschungszentrum U-bahn sign shows directions to some of the top scientific organisations in the world.

It’s hard to believe I have been here little over three months. I’m enjoying the sites, sounds and tastes of this quiet, little suburban town just outside Munich. As I head to work each morning, it is sometimes hard to resist the temptation of the local bakery.

Krapfen

A type of doughnut common to Germany, known as a “Krapfen” in Bavaria and much of Austria. More commonly known as a “Berliner”.

Pretzel (or "Bretzel" as they are known in Bavaria).

Pretzel (or “Bretzel” as they are known in Bavaria).

Of course, Bavaria is also famed for its beers. I personally prefer the ‘dunkles weißbier’ (or dark wheat beer). Most recently I visited the Hofbräuhaus with the giant one-litre beer jugs with huge bretzels.  Being vegetarian, sometimes choices of food can be quite difficult compared with home, but I have become accustomed to spätzle – a type of egg noodle which is best made with cheese. I first tried this in Austria and is not something you can generally find in the UK.

I’m hoping to make the most of the coming few months by exploring the surrounds of Munich more. I hear there are some wonderful castles. I hope to visit Salzburg and Innsbruck, each only an hour or so away in Austria. Maybe I can also stretch a visit to Switzerland to visit a friend, only a few hours or so away from here. I’m looking forward to the coming months here in central Europe.